“Delicate Strength” by Amarine Rose Ravenwood

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Delicate Strength

In her very breath, she’s womanly:
Soft and calm; refined and elegant.
But beneath the soft, a strength of steel;
Intelligent, kind, clever, and relevant.

Indeed, her words may pierce or caress;
A sharp-edged tongue with a velvet underside;
It’s not a deceit, but a complexity;
A duality of form, undefined.

And while she nurtures, she is fierce;
Ready to defend; equally to solace.
While she is loved, held most dear,
She’s not liked by all, and hardly flawless.

The depth of her life contradicted by beauty;
The surface denying what lies underneath;
The softness of voice, that sounds so gentle
Deceiving in every vocal upbreathe.

For under the soft exterior shell,
lies the heart of a lioness, strong and resilient.
As what is all soft cannot fully exist,
The harshness of life creates a balance that’s brilliant.

When you go to judge by a beautiful face,
A beauty that’s elegant; decorated with grace,
Remember that softness belies a great strength,
A gentle exterior with an iron base.

 

Background for this Poem:

I was thinking about the conundrum of duality in women, and how we are often judged as weak, inferior, or lacking in strength because we are beautiful and appear to be frail in comparison to men. When I think of some of the women who have influenced my life, I cannot see any true frailty, only gentleness and a strength of steel hidden beneath their delicate beauty. My own grandmother was one such woman. She was kind and gentle, soft-spoken, elegant, and a lovely person. And inside her was a strength you might never suspect would be encased in such a delicate form. She met every opposition in her life with her chin held up and her shoulders squared. She did not flinch from life’s hardness or its cruelties, but accepted them as a part of life, and wherever she could, she turned them into something good. She made opportunities to show kindness to others. And there are many other people in the world who function in the same way, kindness over a firm foundation of strong will and spirit. This is woman’s dual nature.

 

Author Bio:

Amarine Rose Ravenwood writes poetry and fantasy fiction for children, preteens, and teens. She has been writing since her early teens. As well as being an author and poet and the owner, manager, editor, and publisher of The Literary Librarian journal, Amarine is also a freelance fiction editor for Night Sky Book Services and also provides services as a poetry editor for Poetry Passions Editing Services. Amarine’s poetry joins the hosted poems of The Literary Librarian’s Pantheon of Poesy as just another poem, and Amarine abides by the same guidelines The Literary Librarian has set up for all poetry submissions to this site, as just one more member of a larger writing community.

 

Find More By Amarine at:

“A Mother’s Treasure,” “The Free Spirit,” and “A Grandmother’s Promise” in Voice of Eve, Issue 2, pages 50-56:

“The Fairy Queen” poem in the Cadence anthology by Clarendon House Publications

Amarine’s Facebook Author Page

Amarine Ravenwood’s Magical Realm (WordPress blog)

Amarine’s Twitter

 

© The Literary Librarian 2019

“Imagine” by Joan McNerney

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Imagine

Imagine to be a bird
slicing air with wings.

Up up over that horizon
soaring through clouds
away from solemn earth.

Shining, shimmering
far above this sphere
into clear blue light.

Cutting through sky
gliding over oceans
eyes open all seeing.

Awake all day all night
brushing rushing
against the four winds.

Imagine to be a bird.

 

Author Bio:

Joan McNerney’s poetry has been included in numerous literary magazines such as Seven Circle PressDinner with the Muse, Warriors with Wings, Blueline, and Halcyon Days.  Four Bright Hills Press Anthologies, several Poppy Road Review Journals, and numerous Kind of A Hurricane Press Publications have accepted her work.  Her latest title is “Having Lunch with the Sky” and she has four Best of the Net nominations.

 

© The Literary Librarian 2019

“Outdoor Voices” by Mary Bone

Outdoor voices in trees,
bees buzzing,
birds singing,
in the great outdoors.
Owls are hooting
in the moonlight.
I join my voice with the frogs
who croak at night.
Coyotes howl
in the woods beyond.
Outdoor voices
are all around.

 

Background for this Poem:

This poem is based on the call of spring all around us. Everything around us is celebrating new life and the trees and flowers are so pretty to behold.

 

Author Bio:

Mary Bone CroppedMary Bone has been writing poetry and short stories since the age of twelve. She has written two books of poetry. A few of her poems can be found at https://www.bestpoetry.website/. Her poems have been published in magazines, journals, and other places.

 

© The Literary Librarian 2019

The Pantheon of Poesy Guidelines

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The Pantheon of Poesy is a new area of the Literary Librarian dedicated to showcasing and endorsing poems from published poets in a further effort to promote and support authors.

If you are a published poet who has a poem you would like to see hosted on the Literary Librarian, please use the contact form found in the menu to send an email requesting to submit your poem to the Literary Librarian. The poem does not have to be published to be showcased here, but the author must have at least one previous publication somewhere. Indie authors are always welcome. Upon the poem’s addition to the Pantheon of Poesy, the author will receive a link to the hosted poem to share anywhere, be it on an author page, social media, website, or elsewhere. That link belongs to the author as much as it does to the Literary Librarian.

A new poem may be submitted for hosting on the Literary Librarian’s Pantheon of Poesy by any published author once per month, and the poem will stay on the Literary Librarian indefinitely, unless the author requests that the poem be removed from the site for whatever reason. This ensures that the link to the poem will not expire, and the author needn’t worry about it no longer working where they have shared it. The poem will have a permanent home here, and although it is hosted here, it still belongs to the author in its entirety – the author retains the copyright to their own work.

Please email us a verifiable link to a previously published work (indie/self-published is fine), and your poem, along with an image that relates in some way to the poem (or a photo of yourself), a short bio to be included, your dedication if you want to include one, and a paragraph about what inspired the poem, if you want to include that too. You may also include links to your website, Facebook author page, Twitter, book product pages, and anywhere else that readers can follow you or read more of your work. The photo should be a decent-sized (400 x 400 pixels minimum) public domain image or one that you own because you purchased it, or because you took the photo, yourself. In case you’re not sure where to look for public domain images, one great place to find them is at www.pixabay.com. Another is at www.pexels.com.

Once your poem is published to the Pantheon of Poesy, we will send you a link to your poem that you can share or host anywhere you like, just as you do with your author interviews. This is just one more way that the Literary Librarian supports and promotes authors. Use the Contact form in the menu or send your poems to literary.librarian.authors@gmail.com to email us.

We at the Literary Librarian look forward to seeing what will be submitted and to having another avenue by which we can offer author support! As this is a publishing service, we must now assert our standards. Therefore, let it be stated that reprints and simultaneous submissions are welcome.

Please, do not send us submissions that are graphically violent, erotica, suicidal, hate speech toward the self, or toward any group, culture, person, race, sex, etc.

The Literary Librarian performs this service in a voluntary capacity, free of charge, and therefore retains the right to refuse service to anyone or to decline to publish any poem. Poetry copyright information is located Here.